Sculpture of a dancer (18th century)

by greateasternhome

The Great Eastern Home 18th century sculpture of a dancer (2)

The art of dancing in our country originated as means of pleasing gods and goddesses. Every step, every movement and gesture is an expression of the spiritual. So powerful, indeed, is the religious motivation that our dance has for long been regarded as a divine art meant to portray only the highest and the purest form of sentiments.

The sculpture displayed above is of a female dancer posing on a pedestal that is double bordered with lotus petals. The lady appears poised with a subtle smile on her face. Her eyebrows are neatly trimmed and there is a decorative halo sculpted behind her head. She is draped in a beautiful garment with decorative folds and heavily dressed with ornaments which include mang-tikka on her forehead, earrings, necklace, armlets, bangles and thick anklets on her feet.

The expressive art form in the later periods also became a favorite form of entertainment in the courts and palaces and thereby formed an integral part of splendorous royalty. Not only were the dancers patronized by the kings, but as an art it was also practiced by ladies belonging to the royal and aristocratic families.

It is an ecstatic feeling for an antiques lover to view an artifact from up close. The Great Eastern Home gives its visitors full freedom to savour each piece in its vast collection for as long as they would like to. You can always reach us at www.thegreateasternhome.com. to plan your visit.